Category Archives: Development

WordPress on Docker with sSMTP and Traefik Support

sSMTP has been abandoned on the Ubuntu repository so please move to my mSMTP tutorial instead

Overview

In this tutorial I will share my WordPress on docker with sSMTP setup. The stack includes WordPress (with sSMTP), MariaDB, Adminer, Backup and Traefik support.

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Template engine – Why it’s better to use two of them at once?

Template engine

In the following post I’ll try to show and explain how and why I am using two template engines in every application I’m working on. Also, why and how I am choosing my template engine(s) I’m working with.

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CentOS golang Installation Instructions – for CentOS 6.x

CentOS golang

CentOS golang Installation Instructions – for CentOS 6.x.
In the following tutorial I’ll show how to install and run “Hello, world!” script with golang on CentOS 6.x

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LuaJIT

CentOS LuaJIT Installation instructions

centos luajit installation instructions

centos luajit

centos luajit installation instructions – In the following tutorial I will show you how to install and use the LuaJIT Compiler on your CentOS box.

Before you continue you should already know what is Lua and JIT Compiler.

 

What is LuaJIT?

LuaJIT is a Just-In-Time Compiler (JIT) for the Lua programming language.

LuaJIT has been successfully used as a scripting middleware in games, appliances, network and graphics apps, numerical simulations, trading platforms and many other specialty applications. It scales from embedded devices, smartphones, desktops up to server farms. It combines high flexibility with high performance and an unmatched low memory footprint.

LuaJIT has been in continuous development since 2005. It’s widely considered to be one of the fastest dynamic language implementations. It has outperformed other dynamic languages on many cross-language benchmarks since its first release — often by a substantial margin.

LuaJIT is Copyright © 2005-2014 Mike Pall, released under the MIT open source license.

from LuaJIT website

 

Prerequisities

you need to install a package for GCC before compiling LuaJIT, you can do that by:

yum install gcc

or better, install the development tools:

yum groupinstall “Development Tools”

 

centos luajit installation instructions

Check the LuaJIT download page to check if newer version available. The next insructions are for the latest stable version currently available – LuaJIT-2.0.2

cd /opt
wget http://luajit.org/download/LuaJIT-2.0.2.tar.gz
tar -zxvf LuaJIT-2.0.2.tar.gz
cd LuaJIT-2.0.2
make && make install
# or sudo make install if you are not 'root'

Option 2: using git

OPTIONALLY, you can install LuaJIT using GIT. choose this method only if you want to be updated with the latests patches and updates and your don’t care about the risk of bugs. (NOT FOR PRODUCTION) 

cd /opt
git clone http://luajit.org/git/luajit-2.0.git
cd luajit-2.0
make && make install 
# or sudo make install if you are not 'root'
centos luajit

centos luajit

Running LuaJIT

That’s it. you have luajit installed.

consider the file ‘test.lua’:

print ("Hello, world!")

You can run (interpret) the file using

luajit test.lua

Save bytecode to test.out

luajit -b test.lua test.out
luajit test.out

more information about running luajit here.

 

 

That’s it! you have centos luajit installed.

Cheers!.

VMWare Workstation start on boot CentOS

CentOS Gunicorn installation instructions for newbies

centos gunicorn installation instructions

centos gunicorn

centos gunicorn : In this simple tutorial I’ll explain how to install and run Gunicorn python server on your CentOS machine.

This tutorial is meant for Centos 6.4 and above but it should work on any CentOS 6.x release.

 

What is gunicorn?

From: Gunicorn – Python WSGI HTTP Server for UNIX:

Gunicorn ‘Green Unicorn’ is a Python WSGI HTTP Server for UNIX. It’s a pre-fork worker model ported from Ruby’s Unicorn project. The Gunicorn server is broadly compatible with various web frameworks, simply implemented, light on server resources, and fairly speedy.

 

Installation

Python

before you going to install the centos gunicorn server you need to insure you have the python interperter installed (it should be, as it’s installed by default on the latest CentOS releases). to check that you have python use the command:

python

command not found of course means you need to install python now.

 

Install python

first make sure your have python installed. Simple as:

yum install python

test python by typing: “python” and you should see something similar to:

python

(Ctrl+D to exit)

 

Gunicorn

Next we need to install gunicorn. for this we have (as always) several choices.

1) Using YUM. I personally don’t recommend it. I know some are happy to use the system packaging management wherever possible, but as for python I don’t think it’s the way to go.

To install gunicorn using yum:

yum install python-gunicorn

2) Using easy_install. using easy_install is a better choice for my taste to install python packages. this is how you install gunicorn using easy_install, but I recommend installing gunicorn using PIP as I will show next…

yum install python-setuptools
easy_install gunicorn

3) Using PIP: This is my RECOMMENDED way of installing gunicorn. to install PIP you actually need easy_install so the commands are:

yum install python-setuptools
easy_install pip
pip install gunicorn

Virtualenv

I can’t recommend enough to start working with virtualenv from beginning. At some point in the future, if you are going to consist with python coding, you are going to use the ‘pip update’ command to update some or all your libraries and then expect your python application to stop working.

Python libraries, as any open source library, have the freedom to sacrifice backward compatibility for new features, performance or redesign.

Virtualenv is a python virtual environment tool to ensure that your python applications will work as expected as long you don’t deliberately update some or all of the dependency libraries for that virtual environment specifically.

To install virtualenv (and virtualenvwrapper) and learn the basics read this tutorial. then create your virtual environment and install gunicorn to that environment.

# after you've install pip, virtualenv and virtualenvwrapper
mkproject myapp
workon myapp
pip install gunicorn

 

Running Gunicorn

Basic usage:

$ gunicorn [OPTIONS] APP_MODULE

so for the following myapp.py file:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -

def app(environ, start_response):
    data = 'Hello, World!\n'
    status = '200 OK'
    response_headers = [
        ('Content-type','text/plain'),
        ('Content-Length', str(len(data)))
    ]
    start_response(status, response_headers)
    return iter([data])

just run:

gunicorn -w 4 myapp:app
# Sample output
[INFO] Arbiter booted
[INFO] Listening at: http://127.0.0.1:8000
[INFO] Worker spawned (pid: 16801)
[INFO] Worker spawned (pid: 16802)
[INFO] Worker spawned (pid: 16803)
[INFO] Worker spawned (pid: 16804)
centos gunicorn

centos gunicorn

This command starts gunicorn with 4 workers on port 8000. feel free to experiment and customize the command with additional parameters.

There also command line for using Django <1.4 and Paster. read more here.

Read more about configuring Gunicorn and configuration files.

 

Deploying Gunicorn

on deployment, It’s strongly recommended to use Gunicorn behind a proxy server.

nginx

I personally prefer nginx but it’s not your only choice.

If you want to install nginx on your CentOS machine follow this installation instructions.
use this script (at github) to configure your nginx to pass request to the gunicorn process

 

Monitoring and Logging

Usally you’d want the gunicorn to be run in the background, load on boot and restart on errors. you want also the ability to monitor that process.

There are several tools for that.job, including: Supervisord, Gafferd, runit and many more…  choose what fits you best. here you have examples for monitoring gunicorn using those tools.

 

That it. enjoy playing with your centos gunicorn setup.

 

cento tomcat

CentOS Tomcat server installation is easy!

CentOS Tomcat installation

CentOS Tomcat

centos tomcat

“Apache Tomcat is an open source software implementation of the Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages technologies. The Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages specifications are developed under the Java Community Process.” from Tomcat homepage.

 

Prerequisities

  • CentOS 6.x (I haven’t tested this on older versions but it should probably work as well) 

Check your Java installation

before we’ll continue the installation of Tomcat, the JDK (Java Development Kit) should be installed on your CentOS machine. to check for Java support use the command:

java -version

javanotfound

if bash returns ‘command not found‘ then continue to the next step and install the JDK, else skip the step and continue to Tomcat server installation.

 

Install Java Development Kit (JDK)

To install the jdk we have 2 options:

  1. Install OpenJDK – Using YUM.
  2. Install Oracle JDK – Install manually.

I’ll explore both:

Option 1: Install Open-JDK using YUM

For beginners and testing purposes you should go with this option.

Why should I use the Oracle JDK over the OpenJDK, or vice-versa? [closed]

The command to install JDK using YUM is very simple:

yum install java

yuminstall java

  • Note: use sudo if you are not logged-in with root.
  • the command will install the latest jdk (1.7 as for this date). If you want to install older version use the full name (search using: $ yum search jdk)yum-search-jdk
    You can see you can install the 1.6 version by typing: yum install java-1.6.0

Check you have installed it right:

javafound

 

Option 2: Install JDK manually

Download your required JDK here.

Note: I can’t give you an WGET command to download, because you need to Accept License Agreement before downloading any file.

You can download and install using the RPM or the tar.gz (both with x86 or x64) on your CentOS machine:

downloadjava

 

 

In case of our CentOS we can download and install the .rpm file or the .tar.gz file.

RPM can be installed ONLY by the root.
TAR.GZ can be installed be any user on the computer.

 

Option A: Install using .rpm

make sure to uninstall older installations (if any):

rpm –e <package name>

To install the jdk using the downloaded rpm use the rpm command:

rpm –ivh jdk-7u45-linux-x64.rpm

If you just want to upgrade a package you’ve already installed use the -Uvh parameter.

rpm –Uvh jdk-7u45-linux-x64.rpm

Delete the .rpm file if you want to save disk space.

Read more about installation of Oracle Java on Centos here on ItekBlog

 

Use alternatives :

alternatives –install /usr/bin/java java /usr/java/latest/jre/bin/java 20000
alternatives –install /usr/bin/javaws javaws /usr/java/latest/jre/bin/javaws 20000

alternatives

and config your default jdk (if you have more then one) using:

using:

alternatives –config java

alternatives-config

 

Test your environment

Just as in the first step: type java -version to see if your have jdk installed.

oraclejavaversion

 

Option B: Install using tar.gz

The advantage of tar.gz installation of the JDK is that we can able to install multiple version of java if required.

The archive can be installed by anyone (not only root users), in any location that you can write to. However, only the root user can install the JDK into the system location.

You need to unpack the .tar.gz file (using tar -xzf) into the  the location where you would like the JDK to be installed.

Unpack the tarball and install the jdk:

tar zxvf jdk-7u<version>-linux-i586.tar.gz

Delete the .tar.gz file if you want to save disk space.

 

Use alternatives :

alternatives –install /usr/bin/java java /path/to/jdk1.7.0_45/bin/java 2
alternatives –config java

read more about installation of jdk in the oracle documentation.

for extended installation tutorial read this post by adam in this blog.

 

JDK 1.6 vs JDK 1.7

read more on What is the difference between jdk 1.6 and 1.7 ?

 

Environment Variables

1
JAVA_HOME

 is a 

1
environment

 variable (in Unix terminologies), or a PATH variable (in Windows terminology) you need to create to point to where Java is installed. ($JAVA_HOME/bin/java should execute the Java runtime).

Why doesn’t the Java SDK installer set JAVA_HOME?

To set it for your current session type at bash:

export JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/jdk1.7.0_05
export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin

To set the JAVA_HOME permanently we need to add the commands to the ~/.bash_profile file of the user.
We can also add it /etc/profile and then source it to give to all users.

 

Test Environment Variables

use the echo command to check you’ve configured the variables:

echo $JAVA_HOME
echo $PATH

echovars

 

Installing Tomcat

After we have java installed and tested we can continue to the installation of the Tomcat server.

Download Tomcat

Since Apache Tomcat is distributed as binaries, all you have to do is to download it and start it.

Download apache-tomcat-x.x.xx.tar.gz (latest version or any) from Apache Tomcat Homepage

I’ll go with the tomcat 8 – tar.gz package.

centos tomcat

centos tomcat

and using command:

cd /usr/share
wget http://apache.spd.co.il/tomcat/tomcat-8/v8.0.0-RC10/bin/apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10.tar.gz

tomcat-wget

verify and extract the download using::

md5sum apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10.tar.gz
tar xvzf apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10.tar.gz

and I have a /usr/share/apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10 folder now.

 

Test Tomcat server

Tomcat by default start on port 8080 you can start the server now by typing at bash:

cd apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10
./bin/startup.sh

tomcat-start

 

Now Access the tomcat by connecting your server with a web browser on port 8080.

http://localhost:8080

tomcat

If you cannot access the above Tomcat page, make sure to stop iptables (since CentOS has iptables on by default set to block the Tomcat’s default listening port 8080).

service iptables stop

to permanently disable iptables (NOT RECOMMENDED AT ALL) use:

chkconfig iptables off

Change the Tomcat server port

Locate server.xml in {Tomcat installation folder}/conf/ which is at /usr/share/apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10/conf in our case

Find the following:

 <!-- Define a non-SSL HTTP/1.1 Connector on port 8180 -->
    <Connector port="8080" maxHttpHeaderSize="8192"
               maxThreads="150" minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75"
               enableLookups="false" redirectPort="8443" acceptCount="100"
               connectionTimeout="20000" disableUploadTimeout="true" />

and change the 8080 port to your required port.

 

Start on boot

To start the tomcat service on system boot create the file /etc/init.d/tomcat8 (I am using vi /etc/init.d/tomcat8) and fill it with:

#!/bin/bash 
# description: Tomcat Start Stop Restart 
# processname: tomcat 
# chkconfig: 234 20 80 
JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/jdk1.7.0_05 
export JAVA_HOME 
PATH=$JAVA_HOME/bin:$PATH 
export PATH 
CATALINA_HOME=/usr/share/apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10
 
case $1 in 
start) 
sh $CATALINA_HOME/bin/startup.sh 
;; 
stop) 
sh $CATALINA_HOME/bin/shutdown.sh 
;; 
restart) 
sh $CATALINA_HOME/bin/shutdown.sh 
sh $CATALINA_HOME/bin/startup.sh 
;; 
esac 
exit 0

Now set the permissions on the file and the catalina.sh file:

chmod a+x /etc/init.d/tomcat8
chmod a+x /usr/share/apache-tomcat-8.0.0-RC10/bin/catalina.sh

to start/stop/restart the service use:

service tomcat8 start
service tomcat8 restart
service tomcat8 stop

to start the service on boot use:

chkconfig --add tomcat8
chkconfig tomcat8 on

to disable it later you can use off instead of on:

chkconfig tomcat8 off

 

 

That’s it! you have your CentOS Tomcat server working and runing…